Wounded men heading to an hospital. Most of men had to rely on their friends for a proper evacuation. Despite the efforts of stretcher bearers and medics who sometimes took great risks, most of the time ambulances and field hospitals were litteraly overcrowded by wounded men during large scale offensives. Many of them died suffocating in small shelters or simply bled to death on the side of the road waiting for a convoy.

Wounded men heading to an hospital. Most of men had to rely on their friends for a proper evacuation. Despite the efforts of stretcher bearers and medics who sometimes took great risks, most of the time ambulances and field hospitals were litteraly overcrowded by wounded men during large scale offensives. Many of them died suffocating in small shelters or simply bled to death on the side of the road waiting for a convoy.

ironeurope:

Italian soldier inside a rock bunker in the alps, 1918

ironeurope:

Italian soldier inside a rock bunker in the alps, 1918

(via panczur)

Chasseurs alpins squad. They were nicknamed “Blue devils” by German soldiers. Notice the case of “Lemmon” Foug grenades. Their cheap price and simple design made them widely available between 1916 and the end of the conflict.

Chasseurs alpins squad. They were nicknamed “Blue devils” by German soldiers. Notice the case of “Lemmon” Foug grenades. Their cheap price and simple design made them widely available between 1916 and the end of the conflict.

French guards in a POW camp. They seem pretty relaxed as only a few zealous prisoners tried to escape. Some of the prisoners even found jobs in local farms and married French women after the war.

French guards in a POW camp. They seem pretty relaxed as only a few zealous prisoners tried to escape. Some of the prisoners even found jobs in local farms and married French women after the war.

reichsmarschall:

Charles Nungesser

reichsmarschall:

Charles Nungesser

(via piety-patience-modesty-distrust)

alamaris:

Let me tell you about the Douaumont Ossuary.
The ossuary is surrounded by 16,000+ graves, so it sits smack dab in the middle of the largest WWI cemetary in France.  There’s even a section for Muslim soldiers, facing Mecca.  Inside, the walls, the alcoves, the ceiling, are all covered with memorial plaques naming deceased soldiers.  It’s absolutely lovely.

Outside, it’s not quiet as warm — it feels very much like a fort or a military building.  (As it should do, since it was initiated by the man who would later build the Maginot Line.)

See those little square windows, just below the gridwork?  Those look into 46 rooms, which collectively represent regions in the 20km area around the battle of Verdun.
If you walk up and peer into those windows, this is what you’ll see:

An approximate total of 130,000 French and German remains are piled beneath the two wings of the ossuary.  Some of the longer bones are stacked, as in the photograph, but most of them are unsorted, and the majority are unknown and unnamed by the plaques in the hall above.
The soldiers who lie here represent only a tiny, tiny percentage of the 9.7 million military casualties.  Many people nowadays feel that the ossuary is macabre, distressing, monstrous — but that’s the point.  It should be monstrous.  It needs to be monstrous.  The clean-cut, sanitized war cemeteries you can find all over Europe are beautiful and respectful, yes, but they are to some extent a myth; beneath many of those crisp white crosses are mass graves.  Here, in Douaumont, the designers of this monument were brave enough to show the truth: here, look, this is industrialized warfare, this is the reality.
I think it’s hard for us to really grasp the death toll of WWI without seeing something like this, especially those of us who look back on the world wars from across a vast bridge of years.  I find the numbers hard to comprehend, without visual context.
There is the context.  No cemetary, no memorial, no list of statistics will ever bring the war home the way this structure does — nothing else will make me understand the way I did when I first saw the rooms beneath Douaumont.

A veteran calculated one day that French military casualties of WW1 would take eleven nights and days to walk down the Champs Elysées in reglementary military parade formation. This gives you a good idea of the insane massacre ww1 was.

alamaris:

Let me tell you about the Douaumont Ossuary.

The ossuary is surrounded by 16,000+ graves, so it sits smack dab in the middle of the largest WWI cemetary in France.  There’s even a section for Muslim soldiers, facing Mecca.  Inside, the walls, the alcoves, the ceiling, are all covered with memorial plaques naming deceased soldiers.  It’s absolutely lovely.

Outside, it’s not quiet as warm — it feels very much like a fort or a military building.  (As it should do, since it was initiated by the man who would later build the Maginot Line.)

See those little square windows, just below the gridwork?  Those look into 46 rooms, which collectively represent regions in the 20km area around the battle of Verdun.

If you walk up and peer into those windows, this is what you’ll see:

An approximate total of 130,000 French and German remains are piled beneath the two wings of the ossuary.  Some of the longer bones are stacked, as in the photograph, but most of them are unsorted, and the majority are unknown and unnamed by the plaques in the hall above.

The soldiers who lie here represent only a tiny, tiny percentage of the 9.7 million military casualties.  Many people nowadays feel that the ossuary is macabre, distressing, monstrous — but that’s the point.  It should be monstrous.  It needs to be monstrous.  The clean-cut, sanitized war cemeteries you can find all over Europe are beautiful and respectful, yes, but they are to some extent a myth; beneath many of those crisp white crosses are mass graves.  Here, in Douaumont, the designers of this monument were brave enough to show the truth: here, look, this is industrialized warfare, this is the reality.

I think it’s hard for us to really grasp the death toll of WWI without seeing something like this, especially those of us who look back on the world wars from across a vast bridge of years.  I find the numbers hard to comprehend, without visual context.

There is the context.  No cemetary, no memorial, no list of statistics will ever bring the war home the way this structure does — nothing else will make me understand the way I did when I first saw the rooms beneath Douaumont.

A veteran calculated one day that French military casualties of WW1 would take eleven nights and days to walk down the Champs Elysées in reglementary military parade formation. This gives you a good idea of the insane massacre ww1 was.

(via vfreie)

Two Gunshots to the Head Couldn't Kill This British Soldier | VICE United States

I love the British army because it has the ability to harbor the most interesting set of peculiar and colourful characters.

Didn’t know that Charles de Gaulle’s daughter was a total babe. 1946.

Didn’t know that Charles de Gaulle’s daughter was a total babe. 1946.

qrf-danger-close:

talesofwar:

French POWs walking away from the front, at the end of the war most of men were happy to be taken as prisoners. It simply meant getting away from the the slaughterhouse. North of France.

The French! Such a proud and storied history of vicious resistance fightingo-O

Google “Verdun” or “Bir Hakeim” before making annoying comments please.

qrf-danger-close:

talesofwar:

French POWs walking away from the front, at the end of the war most of men were happy to be taken as prisoners. It simply meant getting away from the the slaughterhouse. North of France.

The French! Such a proud and storied history of vicious resistance fighting
o-O

Google “Verdun” or “Bir Hakeim” before making annoying comments please.

Austro-Hungarian assault troops (k.u.k. Sturmbatallione). They’re armed with the Austrian zeitzünderhandgranates, their medal handle is attached to their belts. Also notice the flare pistol of the officer in the center. This kind od gun was used to request and adjust artillery support according to the color of the flares.

Austro-Hungarian assault troops (k.u.k. Sturmbatallione). They’re armed with the Austrian zeitzünderhandgranates, their medal handle is attached to their belts. Also notice the flare pistol of the officer in the center. This kind od gun was used to request and adjust artillery support according to the color of the flares.